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Upcoming

Victoria Woodhull
Women of Greenwich Village
Red-tailed Hawks
Steamboats on the Hudson

Please note that space is often limited. Reservations are not confirmed until you receive a response from GVSHP regarding your reservation.

If space becomes an issue, all reservations will be honored up until the start of the program, at which point your seat may be given away to those on the wait list.   

Victoria Woodhull: Feminist, Spiritualist, "Mrs. Satan"
A lecture by author John Strausbaugh

Part of GVSHP's Women's History Month Series

Tuesday, March 10
6:30 – 8:00 P.M.
Free; reservations required
Hudson Park Library, 66 Leroy Street, between 7th Avenue South and Hudson Street

Greenwich Village resident Victoria Woodhull was one of the most fascinating and controversial women in 19th-century New York. Born on the frontier in 1838, daughter of a confidence man, she performed as a spirit medium and faith healer as a little girl. In 1868 she came to New York City, where she started the first woman-run brokerage on Wall Street. She also started her own newspaper, was the first woman to address a Congressional committee in Washington, and the first woman to run for President, on a platform that combined feminism, spiritualism, socialism, and most controversially, "free love." Denounced as "Mrs. Satan" and "the Terrible Siren," she lashed out by accusing Reverend Henry Ward Beecher of adultery, inciting the sex scandal of the century. Author John Strausbaugh discusses this extraordinary woman's life and times.

John Strausbaugh's history of Greenwich Village, The Village: 400 Years of Beats and Bohemians, Radicals and Rogues, was one of Kirkus Review's Best Books of 2013. He has written about New York City history and culture for New York Press, the New York Times and The Chiseler.

To register, please call (212) 475-9585 ext. 35 or email.

The Immigrant, Radical, Notorious Women of Washington Square
A lecture by Joyce Gold

This program has reached capacity and we are no longer accepting reservations.

Part of GVSHP's Women's History Month Series

Please note the change of location for this program from the Jefferson Market Library to the Hudson Park Library.

Thursday, March 19
6:30 – 8:00 P.M.
Free; reservations required
Hudson Park Library, 66 Leroy Street, between 7th Avenue South and Hudson Street

Home to many of the political, creative, and intellectual movements in New York’s history, the residences around Washington Square and its amazing female population account for much of that vitality.

Perhaps in no other neighborhood on earth have so many notable women lived and achieved for the last 150 years. Throughout the years, it has seen an unparalleled array of women—working class, gentry, radical, literary, academic, theatrical, convict, and immigrant. Eleanor Roosevelt, Edith Wharton, Louisa May Alcott, Emily Roebling, Bella Abzug, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, Ida Tarbell, Emily Post, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and even the woman who invented the kewpie doll, all shared this famed New York neighborhood.

Highlights of the talk include:
•      Literary, art, and theatre iconoclasts
•      The salon of Mable Dodge, a center of WW I-era activism
•      The tragedy of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire and its role in the labor movement
•      The Suffrage Movement

Joyce Gold teaches Manhattan history at New York University. A contributor to the Encyclopedia of New York, she is the author of From Windmills to the World Trade Center: A Walking Guide through Lower Manhattan History and From Trout Stream to Bohemia: A Walking Guide to Greenwich History. She holds a Masters in Metropolitan Studies from NYU. The New York Times has called her “the doyenne of city tour guides.”

To register, please call (212) 475-9585 ext. 35 or email.

The Red-Tail Hawks of Greenwich Village and the East Village
A lecture and slideshow with Gabriel Willow

Wednesday, March 25
6:30 – 8:00 P.M.
Free; reservations required
Washington Square Institute, 51 East 11th Street,
between Broadway and University Place

If you have ever seen the group of people in Washington Square Park with their binoculars, cameras and zoom lenses focused on the top floor of NYU’s Bobst Library, then you’re probably aware of the pair of red-tail hawks that built a nest on a window ledge, and have made Washington Square their home and hunting grounds. Similarly, a pair of red-tails has built a nest on the Christodora House adjacent to Tompkins Square Park. Both pairs have successfully raised offspring for the past several years.

Gabriel Willow is a naturalist, guide, and educator with New York City Audubon, who will describe the nesting, mating, and hunting habits of these predators, and explain why we should welcome them to our neighborhoods.

To register, please call (212) 475-9585 ext. 35 or email.

Steamboats on the Hudson: The Greenwich Village Waterfront
A history with Liz McEnaney

Tuesday, March 31
6:30 – 8:00 P.M.
Free; reservations required
Salmagundi Club, 47 5th Avenue, near 12th Street

In the years between 1807 and 1971, the Hudson River was alive with boat traffic. The great Hudson River Day Liners were perhaps the best known of all the vessels – famous for their elegance and speed. New Yorkers and visitors alike experienced the river and the magnificent landscapes from the decks and plush salons of these grand dames.

Join Liz McEnaney, Executive Director of the SS Columbia Project, for an illustrated lecture about how the vessels, such as the Day Liners, shaped the development of the Greenwich Village waterfront.
  
The SS Columbia Project’s office is located in the historic Ernest Flagg Rectory, in the St. Mark’s Historic District, where GVSHP offices are also located, at 232 East 11th Street.

To register, please call (212) 475-9585 ext. 35 or email.

100 Years of Preservation:
A Conversation with Anthony C. Wood
Co-sponsored by the New York Preservation Archive Project

This program has reached capacity and we are no longer accepting reservations.

Thursday, April 30
6:30 – 8:00 P.M.
Free; reservations required
The Baha'i Center, 53 East 11th Street, between Broadway and University Place

Join Anthony C. Wood, founder of the New York Preservation Archive Project and author of Preserving New York: Winning the Right to Protect a City’s Landmarks, for an intimate discussion of what led to the passage of NYC’s 1965 landmarks law, how it has affected the urban environment since, and the prognosis for preservation looking forward.

In conversation with GVSHP’s Karen Loew, Wood will illuminate the long struggle that preceded the landmark law and the forces that shaped it. As we examine the architectural losses on the way to the law and the preservation of so many remarkable buildings since, we will also evaluate the current political landscape and how preservation may evolve in the 21st century.


This program is part of NYC Landmarks50 Alliance, the multi-year celebration of the 50th anniversary of New York City's Landmarks Law.

 

To register, please call (212) 475-9585 ext. 35 or email.







These programs are made possible in part by the generous support of: The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; New York State Council on the Arts; City Councilmembers Rosie Mendez, Corey Johnson, and Margaret Chin; and GVSHP members.






GVSHP hosts a wide variety of public programs throughout the year.




RSVP INFORMATION


To register for a free event, please call (212) 475-9585 ext. 35 or email.



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