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Preserving Federal Era Row Houses



LATEST NEWS:


Updated and Expanded Report: Saving Federal Houses
02/02/17

57 Sullivan Street, 1816 House, Landmarked after 14 year Effort
04/16/16

Saving Federal Houses (1790-1835) -- GVSHP Report
03/28/16

After nearly half-century wait, 200 year old house at 57 Sullivan Street to finally receive landmark designation
02/23/16

Deatils on City's Vastly Improved Landmarks Backlog Plan
07/15/15

Landmarks Preservation Commission Takes Better Route on "De-Calendaring"
06/23/15

Facing Mass Opposition, City Drops Plan for Mass Decalendaring of Potential Landmarks
12/05/14

Urgent Preservation Alert: City Proposes Mass 'De-Calendaring' of One Hundred Structures Under Consideration for Landmark Status
12/01/14

Historic progress on GVSHP landmarking efforts 06/23/09

LPC to hold landmarking hearing on 57 Sullivan Street 06/17/09

Two more Federal-Era houses GVSHP fought to protect are
  landmarked 07/24/07

City considers designation of five more houses today 10/19/04


Click HERE for more news



Landmark Applications:
32 Dominick Street
129 MacDougal Street







Thank the LPC for landmarking seven of thirteen Federal houses, and urge them to keep going




57 Sullivan LPC Designation Report

57 Sullivan LPC Item Proposed for Designation Presentation


57 Sullivan Street LPC Fact Sheet

57 Sullivan Street LPC Research File

2 Oliver Street LPC Fact Sheet

2 Oliver Street LPC Research File


138 Second Avenue LPC Fact Sheet

138 Second Avenue LPC Research File

Letter from State Senator Brad Hoylman to LPC

Letter from District 2 Councilwoman to LPC

Letter from Manhattan Community Board 2 to LPC

Letter from GVSHP to LPC Opposing Mass De-Calendaring of Buildlings

Letter Expressing Concern over De-Calendaring Vote

Elected officials’ letter of support




The Villager
04/14/16

DNAinfo
10/12/15

Wall Street Journal 06/18/15

New York Times
12/01/14

Downtown Express
06/26/09

New York Times 03/21/04



REPORT: Federal Houses Landmarked or Listed on the State & National Registers of Historic Places, 1999-2016

Report: The Federal Era Row House of Lower Manhattan

All Sites Proposed for De-calendaring

Hamilton Fish House, 21 Stuyvesant Street Landmark Designation Report and State & National Designation Report and Photos

Hamilton-Holly House, 4 St. Mark’s Place Landmark Designation Report

131 Charles Street Landmark Designation Report and State & National Designation Report

32 Dominick Street Landmark Designation Report

34 Dominick Street Landmark Designation Report

36 Dominick Street Landmark Designation Report

486 Greenwich Street Landmark Designation Report

488 Greenwich Street Landmark Designation Report

Dennison and Lydia Wood House, 310 Spring Street Landmark Designation Report

James Brown House, 326 Spring Street Landmark Designation Report and State & National Designation Report and Photos

Old Merchant's House, 29 East 4th Street Landmark Designation Report and State & National Designation Report and Photos

83 and 85 Sullivan Street Landmark Designation Reports and State & National Designation Report and Photos

116 Sullivan Street Landmark Designation Report

127 MacDougal Street Landmark Designation Report

129 MacDougal Street Landmark Designation Report

131 MacDougal Street Landmark Designation Report




GVSHP, the New York Landmarks Conservancy, and the Endangered Building Initiative (EBI) have called upon the city to protect thirteen outstanding federal era rowhouses in Lower Manhattan by designating them as landmarks. Federal row houses were built between the 1790s and the early 1830s, and embodied a newly created “American” architectural style, meant to visually reflect the identity of the young, emerging independent democracy.

Remarkably, about 300 of these houses survive in Lower Manhattan, some in pristine condition, some altered almost beyond recognition. And while many are protected by individual landmark designation or as part of historic districts, more than half of the houses have no protection at all, and these unique historic structures could be lost at any time.

In the late 1990s, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation began the process of documenting all of these incredible survivors, with an eye toward seeing them designated and preserved (this initial study was funded by Preserve New York, a grant program of the Preservation League of New York State and the New York State Council on the Arts). The study was continued and its work greatly expanded by historian Susan DeVries. While a few of these structures have been designated landmarks by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, most remain unprotected.





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The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation : 232 East 11 Street, New York, NY 10003 : 212 475 9585 : info@gvshp.org

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